Doing nothing doesn’t make your credit better over time

While technically the above statement is not true not many people want to wait 7 years for all their negative information to fall off their credit report based on the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

Its human nature to bury our heads in the sand and ignore the problem. Hoping it just “goes away”. If you have 7 years to spare then sure it’s not a problem….Or is it?

If you have a tax lien (state or federal) or if you were sued and had a judgment placed against you that judgment can be refreshed every ten years to make sure it remains in the system due to its age and not fall between the cracks.

Banks do not expect you to have perfect credit. If you do then the rates will obviously be better as it means you are a good risk and worth a low interest rate. Having collection accounts, charge offs, car repossessions and medical bills are not deal breakers but it depends on numerous factors, too many actually to list here.

What you need to understand is these problems cannot have happened last month or in the last few months.  Every file is different and specific recent problems, late payments or collections make banks nervous when someone is asking them for tens of thousands of dollars or even several hundreds of thousands of dollars for a home.

I had one executive of a finance company come to me who was originally from England, she had a bad divorce and left the country not expecting to come back but as life has it she returned about 6 years later and needed to buy a home. However, a collection account ballooned up to approximately $50,000 so we had to implement a plan after I gave her the options that were available to her. She said after the divorce she didn’t plan on coming back for a long time until plans changed business wise but she was forced to return and confront the problems of her past.

So the moral of this story is, sticking your heard in the sand for 90% of the time if not more, does not help. We all need to be proactive. Whether that means doing something now or speaking to some professional to gather advice on what to do in the future.

Hope this little blog helps and if you need to speak to me just send me an email to wayne@waynethecreditguy.com and we can set a time to speak!

 

About Wayne the Credit Guy:

Wayne Sanford, also known as “Wayne the Credit Guy“, is the owner of New Start Financial Corporation. With nearly a decade of experience working in the credit industry, Sanford has personally reviewed more than 13,000 consumer credit files for mortgage professionals, investment groups and consumers. – See more at: http://waynethecreditguy.com/waynes-bio

The ABCs of Establishing Good Credit

Wayne the Credit Guy discusses the keys to establishing good credit in this new article on FreeCreditScore.com.

“The credit game has become a business, and in order to make money that business must keep consumers in debt,” says Wayne Sanford, aka “The Credit Guy.” “Not knowing the rules of the game and having no knowledge of the fine print keeps the consumer tied to the system.”

Read the full article here.

Do You Really Need to Worry About Your Credit Mix?

Analyzing The Credit Mix that Goes into Your FICO Score

Wayne the Credit Guy discusses the impact your “Credit Mix” has on  your FICO score in this article on CreditCardForum.com.

Excerpt:

If you want to keep things simple, credit can be broken into two categories that contribute to your account diversity: (1) Revolving lines of credit (ie, credit cards) and (2) installment accounts (student loans, mortgages, car loans, etc.), says Wayne Sanford, founder of Dallas-Fort Worth–based New Start Financial.

Why does FICO reward those who have both? Keeping up with installment loans demonstrates the reliability lenders like – but these loans also come with a big incentive to make payments on time (they’re often secured with your house or vehicle). Revolving accounts give you a lot more freedom to fail, since you don’t run the risk of losing the things you bought with them.

Clean Up Credit Before Finding New Apartment

Clean Up Credit Before Finding New Apartment

Wayne the Credit Guy discusses the impact an eviction can have on your credit report in this article on FoxBusiness.com.

Excerpt:

Credit reports do not show records of evictions. According to Wayne Sanford, president of the credit consulting company New Start Financial, “If you are evicted, then it will show up as a collection as any apartment debt a consumer owes, such as cleaning fees or lease breaking.”